The Witch 2015 Movie Review

The Witch (2015) Movie Review

The Witch: A New England Folktale is a superb supernatural horror that calls to the area’s history, secrets, and darkest fears. It is the directorial debut of Robert Eggers, winning him a directing award at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival.

I was wary about going to see a dark horror at the theater – more wary of the disappointment usually felt. But this one did not fail to deliver. There are no predictable jump-scare moments, no eye rolls at the dialogue. Instead I found an intelligent horror that felt like a cross between The Crucible and The Omen.

A family of seven is banished from a New England town and they set off to homestead on the edge of a black forest. Almost immediately, the infant disappears and the audience is left to fret over a short scene with a naked old woman who is crunching up something in a barrel.

Filmed in waning light with a constant grey sky and with an eerie music score, strange events continue to occur to the family until the eldest daughter Thomasin, portrayed by Anya Taylor-Joy, is accused of witchcraft.

Is she guilty?

The Witch describes the worst fears of the colonizing pilgrims and puritans – witchcraft and devilry. The dialogue, the voices, the belief sets – incredibly authentic. And the acting is superb. This is highly suggested if you’re in for a good fright.

The Witch: A New England Folktale is a superb supernatural horror that calls to the area's history, secrets, and darkest fears. It is the directorial debut of Robert Eggers, winning him a directing award at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. I was wary about going to see a dark horror at the theater - more wary of the disappointment usually felt. But this one did not fail to deliver. There are no predictable jump-scare moments, no eye rolls at the dialogue. Instead I found an intelligent horror that felt like a cross between The Crucible and The Omen. A family of seven is banished from a New England town and they set off to homestead on the edge of a black forest. Almost immediately, the infant disappears and the audience is left to fret over a short scene with a naked old woman who is crunching up something in a barrel. Filmed in waning light with a constant grey sky and with an eerie music score, strange events continue to occur to the family until the eldest daughter Thomasin, portrayed by Anya Taylor-Joy, is accused of witchcraft. Is she guilty? The Witch describes the worst fears of the colonizing pilgrims and puritans - witchcraft and devilry. The dialogue, the voices, the belief sets - incredibly authentic. And the acting is superb. This is highly suggested if you're in for a good fright.

Freaky In a Good Way

My Rating

Five Stars

I didn't find it terrifying, but I was completely absorbed. A beautiful horror, if there is such a thing.

100

Rebecca Skane

Rebecca Skane is the editor-in-chief for the Portsmouth Review. She holds a Bachelor of the Arts degree from Lawrence University in Wisconsin and resides in Portsmouth, NH with her husband and two children. She is the founder of The Portsmouth Book Club which boasts over 1,000 members. She also doubles as a professional escapist.Her genres are scifi and fantasy, both adult and young adult - but she often reads outside of her preferred genres. You can follow her on GoodReads.Aside from her love of good books, she is a professional website developer, content editor, and SEO expert. You can visit her web design and development site at RebeccaSkane.com.


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